Timms (2011) 60 Social Situations and Discussion Starters to Help Teens on the Autism Spectrum Deal with Friendships, Feelings, Conflict and More: Seeing the Big Picture

Teenagers and older children on the autism spectrum are, like everyone else, surrounded by complex social codes and rules that govern everyday interaction, but have much more difficulty in interpreting them. Reading cues such as sarcasm, idioms and body language often presents an impossible challenge, but this book of realistic and thought-provoking stories provides much needed help. Written with both parent and teen in mind, every story outlines a real-life situation that young people on the autism spectrum are likely to encounter. Each story is followed by questions such as 'what else might he have done?', 'how do you think she felt?' and 'why do you think they were upset?' along with practical tips for parents on how to initiate constructive discussions. As teens consider these questions with adults, they will begin to be able to put themselves into someone else's shoes and think about how their actions and behaviour may affect those around them. This process will equip them to transfer this invaluable understanding and confidence to other everyday life situations. Timms, L. A. (2011). 60 Social Situations and Discussion Starters to Help Teens on the Autism Spectrum Deal with Friendships, Feelings, Conflict and More: Seeing the Big Picture. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 

Simone (2012) 22 Things a Woman with Asperger’s Syndrome Wants Her Partner to Know

Rudy Simone covers 22 common areas of confusion for someone dating a female with AS and includes advice from her own experience and from other partners in real relationships. She talks with humour and honesty about the quirks and sensitivities that you may come across when getting to know your partner. All the pivotal relationship landmarks are discussed, including the first date, sex, and even having children. This entertaining and easy-to-read book will be ideal for anyone dating, or in a relationship with, an AS female. Women with AS themselves, and their families and friends, will also enjoy the book and find it useful. Counsellors and other professionals working with women with AS will find the insight offered extremely enlightening. Simone, R. (2012). 22 Things a Woman with Asperger's Syndrome Wants Her Partner to Know. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 

Itzchaka and Zachor (2011) Who benefits from early intervention in autism spectrum disorders?

Research in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) described individual differences in response to intervention. This study explored child and parental characteristics at baseline that predict outcomes in adaptive skills and acquisition of cognitive gains. Seventy-eight children aged 15–35 months diagnosed with ASD by standardized diagnostic tools were included. Evaluations of verbal and non-verbal abilities, adaptive skills and autism severity were obtained at pre-intervention (T1) and after one year of intervention (T2). At T2, children improved significantly in their verbal ability and the severity of autism symptoms was reduced. Outcome in adaptive skills was best predicted by baseline verbal ability and maternal age. Better verbal ability especially in those with severe autism symptoms, and older maternal age predicted better adaptive skills outcome. T1 autism severity, child's age and maternal age and educational attainment best predicted cognitive gains. Less severe autism symptoms, younger child's age at start of intervention, older maternal age and higher maternal education predicted greater cognitive gains with intervention. The study suggests biological factors including age, language abilities and autism severity and environmental factors including maternal age and education, impact the ability to benefit from early intervention in ASD. Itzchaka, E.B. and Zachor, D.A. (2011). Who benefits from early intervention in autism spectrum disorders? Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 5(1), p. 345–350.
 

Edmonds and Beardon (2008) Asperger Syndrome and Employment: Adults Speak Out about Asperger Syndrome

Employment is an important part of a healthy, balanced and fulfilling life but less than 20 per cent of people with Asperger Syndrome (AS) are in work at any one time. The adults with AS in this book explore the issues surrounding employment, providing advice and insights for others with AS as well as their employers and colleagues. Edmonds, G. and Beardon, L. (2008). Asperger Syndrome and Employment: Adults Speak Out about Asperger Syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 

Gabriels and Hill (2007) Growing Up with Autism: Working with School-Age Children and Adolescents

Later childhood and adolescence can pose unique challenges for people with autism and their families. This volume presents practical recommendations for clinicians and educators by featuring case studies and an in-depth assessment form. It also provides guidance and suggestions for supporting positive behaviour, communication, and social skills and managing issues related to mental and physical health. The book addresses issues of accessing services and planning the transition process, which will be of particular interest to parents of children with ASD. Gabriels, R.L. and Hill, D.E. (Eds.) (2007). Growing Up with Autism: Working with School-Age Children and Adolescents. New York: Guilford Press.