Barbaro and Dissanayake (2007) A Comparative Study of the Use and Understanding of Self-Presentational Display Rules in Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger’s Disorder

The use and understanding of self-presentational display rules (SPDRs) was investigated in 21 children with high-functioning autism (HFA), 18 children with Asperger’s disorder (AspD) and 20 typically developing (TD) children (all male, aged 4- to 11-years, matched on mental age). Their behaviour was coded during a deception scenario to assess use of SPDRs; understanding of SPDRs was assessed via three real/apparent emotion-understanding vignettes. The children with HFA and AspD used less effective SPDRs than the TD children, but there were no group differences in understanding SPDRs. The children with HFA and AspD did not differ on their use or understanding of SPDRs, and the results are discussed in relation to the similarities and differences between these diagnostic conditions. Barbaro, J. and Dissanayake, C. (2007). A Comparative Study of the Use and Understanding of Self-Presentational Display Rules in Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger’s Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Vol. 37, p. 1235–1246.
 

Burke (2010) A better life: Alternative approaches from the perspective of families and carers of older people with high support needs

This paper draws on case studies from Counsel and Care’s advice service to highlight issues raised by carers of older people with high support needs. It explores how ‘traditional approaches’ such as residential care and extra care housing could be improved and considers the importance of housing in alternative approaches. It also suggests key elements of a future agenda. Burke, S. (2010). A better life: Alternative approaches from the perspective of families and carers of older people with high support needs. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.
 

Wilkinson (2010) A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools

With a focus on best practice and the importance of early diagnosis, this book provides a practical and scientifically-based approach to the assessment and diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. This book offers a balance of conceptual, practical and empirical information designed to bridge the research-to-practice gap in identifying, assessing, and treating school-aged children with autism-related conditions. Assessment tools and intervention strategies will support school-based professionals in identifying and assessing young people with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder, developing and implementing classroom-based intervention programs, initiating a dialogue between parents and teachers, accessing community resources and promoting special needs advocacy. Wilkinson, L. A. (2010). A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
 

Dunn Buron (2007) A “5” is against the law! Social boundaries: straight up! An honest guide for teens and young adults

Building on her popular 5-Point Scale, A 5 Is Against the Law! Kari Dunn Buron takes a narrower look at challenging behavior with a particular focus on behaviors that can spell trouble for adolescents and young adults who have difficulty understanding and maintaining social boundaries. Using a direct and simple style with lots of examples and hands-on activities, A 5 Is Against the Law! speaks directly to adolescents and young adults. Dunn Buron, K. (2007). A "5" is against the law! Social boundaries: straight up! An honest guide for teens and young adults. Overland Park, KS : Autism Asperger Publishing Co.
 

Dunn Buron (2007) A “5” Could Make Me Lose Control! An activity-based method for evaluating and supporting highly anxious students

This unique hands-on activity helps students who are highly anxious cope with their stress by systematizing social and emotional information. Using this self-contained product, the student literally sorts cards describing highly stressful situations into colorful pockets designating stress levels, ranging from 5-1, as a first step in changing the way he thinks about and responds to emotions such as anxiety, sadness and anger. A laminated erasable page and blank cards enable parents and teachers to individualize this innovative program. Suggestions for how to include it as part of a functional behavior assessment and a problem-solving activity are included. Dunn Buron, K. (2007). A "5" Could Make Me Lose Control! An activity-based method for evaluating and supporting highly anxious students. Overland Park, KS: Autism Asperger Publishing Co.