Frith and Hill (2004) Autism: Mind and Brain

Research into cognitive and neurophysiological basis of autism has intensified over the last two decades. This book presents an important overview of autism research in the 21st century discussing currently conducted experiments. The book focuses on new ideas and findings that are gradually influencing our understanding of autism and its variants such as the use of functional and structural brain imaging studies and behavioural measures. The publication will be an interesting read for developmental psychologists and neuroscientists as well as educational psychologists and philosophers of mind. Frith, U. and Hill, E. (Eds.) (2004). Autism: Mind and Brain. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012) Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders

The Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network is an American surveillance system, which estimates the prevalence of ASD among children aged 8 years whose parents or guardians reside within 14 Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network sites. The latest findings on prevalence of ASD are presented in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) suggesting that the condition is more common than it was previously thought. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders – Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network 14 sites, United States, 2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 61(SS03), p. 1-19.
 

Standifer (2009) Adult Autism and Employment: A Guide for Vocational Rehabilitation and Professionals

This guide is an outgrowth of another book, the Handbook of Disabilities. It grew out of an awareness of the limitations of the previous handbook entry on Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The updated entry soon grew too large for the handbook and became this report.   Standifer, S. (2009). Adult Autism and Employment: A Guide for Vocational Rehabilitation and Professionals. DPS & Curators of the University of Missouri: Disability Policy and Studies. School of Health Professions, University of Missouri.
 

Lewis, Keefe and Curphey (2012) Guide To Mental Health & Debt 2012. Help, info, guidance and support for individuals and carers

Debt and mental health problems, be they caused by redundancy, bereavement, relationship breakdown, abuse or just naturally occurring, are rarely talked about but very common. What’s also rarely discussed is the link between mental health issues and debt. When debt mounts up, so does stress and anxiety.

Nearly half (44%) of people who have or have had mental health problems have severe or crisis debts, according to a 2011 MoneySavingExpert.com survey. Just one out of ten people who have never had mental health problems have severe or crisis debts.

A 2010 survey by debt counsellors Christians Against Poverty found that 44% of those seeking debt help had been prescribed medication by their GP to help them cope, 77% of those in a couple said debt affected their relationship and 38% had considered or attempted suicide.

Having a mental health problem can also make it difficult to deal with money day to day. It can affect your motivation, judgement and income. If you are signed off sick or unable to work long-term, you may find you struggle to make ends meet.

Fortunately, there is hope and there’s a way out for anyone with a debt problem. It’s important to recognise that you are not struggling alone. The key is to start by taking one or two simple steps and to tackle debt as soon as it starts to mount up.

Lewis, M., Keefe, J. and Curphey, M. (2012). Guide To Mental Health & Debt 2012. Help, info, guidance and support for individuals and carers. London: MoneySavingExpert.com.


 

Balfe and Tantam (2010) A descriptive social and health profile of a community sample of adults and adolescents with Asperger syndrome

Little is known about the health and social profile of adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) living in the community. We conducted a study to describe the living, employment and psycho-social situation of a community sample of forty two adults and adolescents with AS, and to describe these indivdiuals' experiences of accessing health services and taking medication. Most respondents (including those over eighteen years of age) lived at home with their parents. Most had trouble reading and responding to other people's feelings, and coping with unexpected changes. Difficulties with life skills, such as cleaning, washing and hygiene were prevalent. The majority of respondents were socially isolated and a large minority had been sexually or financially exploited. Almost all respondents had been bullied. Mental health problems such as anxiety or depression were common. 30% of respondents said that they regularly became violent and hit other people and 15% had attempted suicide. More positively, the majority of respondents felt that they could access health services if they had a health problem. The results of this study suggest a relatively poor social and health profile for many people with Asperger syndrome living in the community, with high levels of social problems and social exclusion, and difficulties managing day to day tasks such as washing and cleaning; these findings support the results of other studies that have examined psycho-social functioning in this group. Balfe, M. and Tantam, D. (2010). A descriptive social and health profile of a community sample of adults and adolescents with Asperger syndrome. BMC Research Notes, Vol. 3(300).