Winter and Lawrence (2011) Asperger Syndrome – What Teachers Need to Know

This revised and expanded second edition Asperger Syndrome – What Teachers Need to Know provides advice on how best to support students with Asperger syndrome (AS). Concise and accessible, this book gives a summary of common characteristics of AS and offers simple strategies for adapting to the educational needs of students with AS. New material includes information for teaching older children and adolescents with AS, tips on what to do when problems arise, as well as suggestions for a whole-school approach to helping students with AS. This book will be of particular interest to teachers, teaching assistants and those in school management who want to know more about AS in the mainstream inclusive classroom.

Winter, M. and Lawrence, C. (2011). Asperger Syndrome – What Teachers Need to Know (Second Edition). London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


 

Underwood, McCarthy and Tsakanikos (2010) Mental health of adults with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability

This article critically reviews recent studies on individuals with intellectual disability who have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and experience higher rates of mental health problems than those without ASD. It suggests that recent studies do not provided enough evidence to support the hypothesis that adults with intellectual disability and ASD are more vulnerable to psychiatric disorders than those without ASD. Factors found to be associated with poorer mental health include severity of intellectual disability, adaptive behaviour skills and social skills.

Underwood, L., McCarthy, J., Tsakanikos, E. (2010). Mental health of adults with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Vol. 23(5), p. 421-6.


 

Patrick (2008) Social Skills for Teenagers and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: A Practical Guide to Day-to-Day Life

This resource provides practical strategies for helping teenagers and adults with Asperger’s syndrome to navigate social skills, friendships and relationships at home and in the community. The author offers advice and useful strategies for tackling day-to-day problems such as visits to the dentist or going on holidays, as well as more intimate topics such as dating and acquiring and maintaining friendships. The chapters are structured around real-life scenarios and the challenges they present, followed by step-by-step solutions and suggestions. This accessible guide will be of interest to teenagers and adults with Asperger’s syndrome and their families, teachers, therapists, counsellors, carers, social and health work professionals.

Patrick, N. J. (2008). Social Skills for Teenagers and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: A Practical Guide to Day-to-Day Life. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


 

Ordetx (2012) Teaching Theory of Mind: A Curriculum for Children with High Functioning Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, and Related Social Challenges

This book provides teachers and other professionals with an effective, easy-to-follow curriculum for teaching children with high-functioning autism, Asperger’s syndrome and related social challenges to relate to and interact with others successfully by developing a solid, basic foundation in Theory of Mind (ToM). It also provides an accessible overview of the key concepts of ToM. Twelve lesson plans for use with children aged approximately 7-16 are presented, each of which is accompanied by activities for practicing and reinforcing the concepts and skills learnt at home. Used effectively with many hundreds of students, this curriculum will also be of interest to other professionals, i.e. behavioral therapists, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists, and school and guidance counsellors.

Ordetx, K. (2012). Teaching Theory of Mind: A Curriculum for Children with High Functioning Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, and Related Social Challenges. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


 

Leekam, Prior and Uljarevic (2011) Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Research in the Last Decade

Restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRBs) are a core feature of autism spectrum disorder. They constitute a major barrier to learning and social adaptation. The last decade of research has identified new measurement techniques and distinctive subtypes of RRBs. This article discusses promising new ideas and evidence on origins of RRBs emerging from neurobiology and developmental psychology. It also suggests areas for further research and makes recommendations for taking a developmental perspective by implementing early intervention targeted to improve RRBs.

Leekam, S. R., Prior, M. R., Uljarevic, M. (2011). Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Research in the Last Decade. Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 137(4), p. 562-593.